2024 Annual Security & Fire Safety Report

Tompkins Cortland Community College Campus Police
Main Building, Room 118
Phone: 607.844.6511
Website
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Published in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Statistics Act

campus photo

 

Dear Campus Community Member,

At Tompkins Cortland Community College, ensuring your safety is our top priority. Our Campus Police Department, is comprised of highly trained, sworn peace officers, who operate round-the-clock, every day of the year. They are dedicated to actively preventing crime on campus and employ a policing style focused on student success and education. You'll regularly encounter our officers throughout the campus, fostering a visible presence and nurturing trusting, collaborative relationships within our community.

Tompkins Cortland Community College is nestled in a picturesque rural setting overlooking the Town of Dryden, the campus exudes serenity and security. Despite this tranquil environment, we emphasize that safety and security are responsibilities shared by all members of our campus community. We encourage vigilance and prompt reporting of any suspicious activities or crimes to us. Your cooperation enhances our ability to prevent crime proactively and maintain a safe campus environment.

While we strive tirelessly, some instances of crime may inevitably occur. When this happens, we treat all campus-related crimes with the utmost seriousness, by conducting thorough investigations into each incident. Additionally, we ensure the campus community remains informed of any immediate or ongoing threats through our campus-wide mass notification system, including emergency mobile alerts.

At Tompkins Cortland Community College, your safety is paramount. Our commitment extends around the clock to ensure your time on campus is safe and fulfilling. Please save our contact number in your phone and remember to dial 911 in emergencies for immediate assistance.

We trust that you will find our 2024 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report both informative and valuable. This report serves to provide essential campus safety information and to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. Should you have any questions regarding the report or any other inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact our Campus Police office.

Wishing you a safe and productive academic year ahead in 2024-2025.

Sincerely, 

Christopher Austen 
Director, Campus Police

Table of Contents

The Clery Act

The Jeanne S. Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) is a federal law originally passed in 1990 that amends the Higher Education Act of 1965. The original act and several subsequent amendments require colleges and universities who receive federal funding to share information about crime on campus, their efforts to improve campus safety, as well as procedures for informing the campus community in a timely manner about incidents that pose an immediate or ongoing threat to the safety of the campus community. This information is required to be made publicly available each year by October 1st in the form of an Annual Security Report (ASR).

The Annual Security & Fire Safety Report

Tompkins Cortland Community College prepares a combined Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (ASFSR) in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). The purpose of this report is to provide current and prospective faculty, staff, and students with campus safety information that will allow each member or prospective member of the campus community to make informed decisions about their own personal safety and well-being.

This report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes, disciplinary referrals, and arrests that occurred on campus; in certain non-campus buildings or properties owned or controlled by Tompkins Cortland Community College; and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. This report also includes information on campus safety and security policies, including institutional policies on: campus facility security and access; the reporting of crimes; emergency response and timely notification; alcohol and drug use; fire safety, crime and sexual violence prevention programming; victim’s rights and resources; and Title IX and sexual misconduct policies and procedures.

Preparation & Disclosure of the Annual Security & Fire Safety Report

The Tompkins Cortland Community College Campus Police Department is responsible for preparing and distributing the Annual Security & Fire Safety Report. Crime and judicial referral statistics (including Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and Hate Crimes) are collected from the Tompkins Cortland Community College Campus Police Department, Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, local and state law enforcement, and other identified Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) with significant responsibility for student and campus activities. Of note, Clery crime statistics are compiled in accordance with the Uniform Crime Reporting System of the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation and may vary from New York State Penal Law definitions.

On October 1st of each year, the Tompkins Cortland Community College Campus Police Department sends an e-mail notification to all members of the campus community making notification of the availability of the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. The communication provides website information to access the report. Hardcopies of the report may also be obtained at the Campus Police Department, located in the Tompkins Cortland Community College Main Building (Room 118). Anyone, including prospective students and prospective employees, may obtain a copy by calling the Campus Police Department at 607.844.6511 or visiting the college’s website.

Tompkins Cortland Community College Campus Police

Campus Police

Mission, Training, and Authority

The Campus Police mission is to protect life and property and work to create an optimal environment for students, faculty and staff to live, learn and work. To that end, the Campus Police adopt a proactive style of campus law enforcement with an emphasis on student success-oriented policing. Professionalism and ethics stand at the forefront of all that we do, and we never forget that we exist to support the goals and mission of the College.

The Campus Police Department consists of sworn law enforcement professionals who have completed the NYS DCJS Basic Police Academy at a local regional academy, and through extensive training, have gained Police Officer or Peace Officer status with New York State’s Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS). All Campus Police Officers undergo continuous training to maintain and improve their skills. Officers also maintain certifications in first aid, CPR and AED use.

Campus Police Officers have full powers of arrest and search and seizure as defined in New York State Criminal Procedure Law. As part of their policing authority, they also have the authority to take into custody and transport, in accordance with the NYS Mental Hygiene Law, a person deemed to be an immediate danger to themselves or others. Campus Police Officers have complete authority to apprehend and arrest anyone engaged or involved in illegal acts on campus and areas immediately adjacent to the campus, as well as any College operated facility. If offenses involving violations of the Student Code of Conduct occur, Campus Police Officers may also refer the individual to the College’s Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards for judicial action.

Working Relationships with Local Law Enforcement Agencies

The Campus Police maintain a close working relationship with our neighboring fellow law enforcement agencies, including the Tompkins and Cortland County Sheriff’s Departments, the Ithaca, Cortland, and Dryden Police Departments, and the New York State Police. The Campus Police have direct radio communication with all law enforcement agencies in Tompkins County and the Tompkins County 911 Center in order to facilitate a coordinated and rapid response in any emergency situation. 

Crime related reports and statistics are routinely shared between agencies and any report of a College affiliated individual found to have engaged in criminal activity at an off-campus location will be forwarded to the College’s Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards for further action.

The New York State Campus Safety Act of 1999 requires all public and private colleges and universities in New York to have a formal plan that provides for the investigation of missing students or violent felony offenses on campus. This involves written agreements between university and college authorities and the municipal law enforcement agencies having concurrent jurisdiction. Campus Police have a local Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Tompkins County Sheriff’s Office in the event a missing student or violent felony is reported to campus authorities. Should such a report be received, Campus Police would request assistance from Tompkins County Sheriff’s Office per stipulations within the MOU and would conduct a complete joint investigation.

Reporting Crimes

Reporting Locations / Clery Geography 

On-Campus Property: Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor). 

Non-Campus Property: Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution; or any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.

Public Property: All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. 

The law requires that campuses report specific criminal activities that occur on campus property and specific areas around those properties. Crimes do occur in the community beyond what is required to be reported in this document. Students and employees are advised to exercise caution in ALL locations.

Reporting a Crime or Emergency on Campus

To report a crime or an emergency on the Tompkins Cortland Community College campus call 911 from any cellular or campus phone, or contact the Campus Police at 607.844.6511, or by dialing extension 6511 from any campus phone. 

Remember, an emergency is ANY situation that poses an immediate threat to life and/or property. Campus community members play a large role in maintaining the safety of our campus, and we strongly encourage all community members to promptly report any illegal or suspicious activity to the Campus Police in a timely fashion.

Reporting a Crime or Emergency off Campus

To report a crime or emergency at an off-campus location or College extension center call 911 and you will be connected with the appropriate law enforcement agency and services for your current location. If you are the victim of an off-campus crime, we encourage all campus community members to relay relevant information about the incident to the Campus Police at 607.844.6511 when you are safe to do so. We may be able to act as a resource for you and/or the information you provide us may be relevant to your safety on campus and allow us to better serve you.

Campus Security Authorities (CSA)

A Campus Security Authority is a Clery-specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with the College that have the responsibility of promptly and accurately reporting crimes to the Campus Police. The four groups of CSAs are:

  • a campus police department or a campus security department;
  • any individual(s) who have responsibility for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department;
  • any individual or organization specified in the College’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and;
  • any official of the College who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities.

Reporting to Campus Security Authorities

While Tompkins Cortland Community College encourages campus community members to promptly report all crimes and emergencies directly to the Campus Police, we also recognize that some may be more comfortable reporting to other individuals or College offices. When a CSA receives a direct report of a Clery Act crime that they deem was made in good faith, they are required to report all known relevant details about the crime to the Campus Police, including the nature of the crime, date, time and location. The identity of the victim or perpetrator does not have to be disclosed when making a report to the Campus Police. However, if the incident causes an immediate or ongoing threat, or poses any other serious concern for the safety of the campus community, the Campus Police may request further details to ensure the safety and well-being of the campus community.

Why the College Has Campus Security Authorities

Many crimes, especially sexual assaults, are not reported directly to the Campus Police. Some people are more comfortable reporting crimes or concerning incidents to campus employees with whom they have a more familiar relationship. In order to comply with the Clery Act, we need to be as comprehensive as possible in ensuring that we gather data on all Clery reportable crimes. Therefore, we collect crime data from a wide variety of CSAs.

Identifying and Training Campus Security Authorities

The Director of Campus Police collaborates with various College departments and offices to identify CSAs. The Director of Campus Police provides online training on a biannual basis for new and returning CSAs.

Voluntary Limited Confidential Reporting

If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within the College’s Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a report to the Campus Police. The victim or witness of a crime can make a voluntary, limited confidential report to the Campus Police and choose to not have it further investigated. The intent of voluntary, limited confidential reporting is to comply with the wishes of the reporting party, to allow aggregate Clery crime data to be collected and included in the annual disclosure of crime statistics, and to allow the Campus Police to keep the campus community informed regarding any immediate or ongoing threats to the safety of the campus community.

The Campus Police will do everything possible to respect the confidential nature of the report, however, if the reported incident causes an immediate or ongoing threat, or poses any other serious concern for the safety of the campus community, the Campus Police may release limited information about the incident in order to protect the campus community. Every effort will be made to protect he identity of the reporting individual. 

Anonymous Reporting

College students and employees can also file an online, anonymous report for non-academic conduct issues, interpersonal violence, sexual harassment/ misconduct and allegations of discrimination at: www.tompkinscortland.edu/college-info/report-incident. Reports made in this manner will be included in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. The Campus Police reminds the campus community that online reporting options are not appropriate for emergency situations or incidents that require a timely response. 

Exemptions from Reporting for Professional & Pastoral Counselors, and Medical Professionals 

Professional and pastoral counselors and medical professional who receive reports of Clery crimes while providing direct treatment are not required to report any information to the Campus Police. While crimes reported to professional and pastoral counselors and medical professionals are not required to be reported, the Campus Police strongly encourages these individuals to report non-identifiable incidents of crime to the Campus Police for the purpose of assessing for and issuing emergency alerts and/or timely warning notifications, and to allow the Campus Police to collect crime data for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. Professional and pastoral counselors and medical professionals providing direct treatment are encouraged, if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform reporting persons they are counseling/treating of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics. Exempt status is not applicable when a student, staff or faculty member presents serious harm and imminent danger to self or others as indicated by New York Mental Hygiene Law §9.45 and §9.46; or aforementioned individuals are not acting in their roles at the time of a disclosure.

Professional Counselor Defined: An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certificate.

Pastoral Counselor Defined: An employee of an institution who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and who is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.

Medical Professional Defined: A physician or other qualified health care professional is an individual who is qualified by education, training, licensure/regulation (when applicable), and facility privileging (when applicable) who performs a professional service within his/her scope of practice and independently reports that professional service.

On-Campus Confidential Reporting Locations

Office of Health and Wellness Services: Main Building, Room 118A, Room 122 607.844.8222 Ext. 4487

Tompkins Cortland Community College has designated the following offices as locations where the campus community members should report crimes:

  • Campus Police Office: Main Building, Room 118 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 6511
  • Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards:  Main Building, Room 248 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4316
  • Title IX Committee (Senior Coordinator):  Main Building, Room 248 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 6591
  • Residence Life Office:  24 Farview Drive, 1st Floor / 607.844.8222, Ext. 6589
  • Office of Student Affairs:  Main Building, Room 248 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4316
  • Office of Diversity Education & Support Services:  Main Building, Room 230 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4358
  • Student Activities Center:  Main Building, Student Center / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4442
  • Student Success, Advisement & Transfer Services:  Main Building, Room 101 / 607.844.8222, Ext.4246
  • Athletics Department:  Athletic Facility, 2nd Floor / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4492
  • Office of Access & Equity Services:  Main Building, Room 130 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4283

Off-Campus Crimes Involving Students

Tompkins Cortland Community College does not operate off-campus housing or recognize off-campus student organizations. However, the College does support local law enforcement in responding to instances of student criminal behavior off campus. When a Tompkins Cortland Community College student is involved in an off-campus offense, Campus Police Officers may respond to the scene and/or assist with the investigation in cooperation with local, state, or federal law enforcement. The Campus Police also relies on its close working relationships with local law enforcement agencies to receive information about incidents involving students that occur off campus. If students are found to have engaged in criminal activity at an off-campus location, they will be referred to the College’s Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards for judicial action.

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Safety on Campus

Security and Access to Campus Buildings

Main Campus Buildings: During business hours, the College will be open to students, employees, contractors, guests and visitors. During non-business hours, main campus buildings are generally locked and access to all buildings is limited by key, or by admittance by Campus Police permission. Certain College employees are issued keys for main building access based on specific job function and need, as determined by departmental supervisors and other designated College authorities. Employees are responsible for reporting missing and stolen keys to their direct supervisor in a timely manner. The College Facilities Department Director is responsible for maintaining an accurate and up-to-date record of all individuals to whom they have issued keys.

Specific main campus buildings, or portions of said buildings, may adopt different procedures or hours of operations for approved and designated special uses (e.g., late night student activities, special events, etc.). Special use or after-hours use of these buildings is approved and monitored by the Campus Police Department. Access to most after-hours student activities events is limited to current Tompkins Cortland Community College students with valid ID, with building access limited to the specific event location. 

Access to main campus buildings, and any events held therein, is a privilege extended to students, faculty, staff and visitors for duly authorized purposes. Campus Police Officers may request that any individual on College property without authorization or valid purpose, or is creating public annoyance and alarm, or is unable to provide appropriate identification, leave the premises or be subject to prosecution for criminal trespass.

Residence Life Buildings: Exterior doors to the residence halls are locked twenty-four hours a day and are equipped with a card access system. Students living in each residence hall access their building using their College ID card. Students will need to carry their ID card and apartment/bedroom keys at all times. Building residents are responsible for meeting visitors at the entrance and escorting them while they are in the building. Residents are not allowed to have visitors on premises for more than forty-eight hours within a seven-day period. Residents are responsible for the behavior of their visitors while they are hosting them. 

The College prohibits propping open residence hall exit doors. Such violations of College policy are referred to the Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards for judicial action. 

Over extended breaks, the doors of all residence halls remain secured. Campus Police Officers patrol the residence hall buildings at all times of the day and night, and report any observed door and security hardware issues to Facilities staff to be fixed.

Maintenance of Campus Buildings

Campus Police Officers generate a report for any security related issues (e.g., defective door locks, malfunctioning ID card swipes, fire panel troubles, defective exterior lighting, etc.) they observe while on routine patrol. These reports are forwarded in a timely manner to Facilities staff for remediation of the issue. For security related issues that require immediate attention, Campus Police Officers can contact the designated on-call Facilities staff member. Members of the campus community are encourage to report any safety and security related building and grounds issues that they observe to the Campus Police. 

Security Awareness and Crime Prevention Programs

Periodically throughout the academic year the Campus Police Department, in conjunction with other College offices, may present crime prevention awareness and other personal safety-oriented programs and presentations. Frequently covered topics include:

  • Theft Prevention
  • Personal Safety Awareness
  • Recognizing and Responding to Emergencies
  • Fire Safety
  • Interpersonal Conflict Resolution
  • The Good Samaritan Policy
  • Risk Reduction Related to Alcohol & Drug Use
  • Responding to Active Shooter Incidents
  • Sexual Assault Awareness & Affirmative Consent
  • Crime Reporting Options & Procedures
  • Available Resources & Support Services (on and off campus)
  • Campus Safety Orientation & Review of Security Services for New College Employees

Much of the above information is presented by the Campus Police Department and other College offices during new student orientation sessions held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. The Director of the Campus Police participates in each orientation session and provides a presentation to the students outlining many aspects of campus safety and security. Campus Police Officers are available after each orientation session to meet with and talk to new students about campus life and begin to build the officer/student rapport that is so essential to student success-oriented policing. The Campus Police Department also sends an informational email to students at the beginning of each semester regarding many of the above listed safety and security topics.

The Campus Police also teams up with other College departments and offices throughout the year to assist with presenting valuable campus safety information:

Residence Life & Campus Police: Staff from each office go door-to-door within the residence halls each fall to meet the residents and discuss important aspects of campus safety and residence life policies. During this meeting, students are also provided with refrigerator magnets that outline many of the safety tips and policies, as well as provide information on important reporting and support resources. 

Title IX & Campus Police: Campus Police staff participate in Yards for Yeardley each year by tabling at the event and actively attempting to engage students and employees about topics related to consent and sexual assault.

Health and Wellness Services & Campus Police: The Campus Police works collaboratively with Health and Wellness Services to enforce the College’s rules and policies regarding alcohol and drug use, and connect students with valuable mental health and substance abuse services that help students manage issues that may otherwise interfere with student success. 

Student Activities & Campus Police: The Campus Police regularly partner with Student Activities to provide training to Student Leaders and safety programming at annual student activities events. The Campus Police programming at these events typically revolves around Drinking & Driving Awareness.

In addition to regular crime prevention and personal safety programming, the Campus Police maintains a highly visible presence and are available twenty-four hours a day to provide safety escorts to students or employees.

Campus Safety Advisory Committee 

Tompkins Cortland Community College’s Campus Safety Advisory Committee (CSAC) is composed of students, staff, and faculty members who are charged with reviewing current campus security policies and procedures and making recommendations for their improvement. CSAC is an advisory committee on campus security in accordance with Section 6431 of Article 129-A of New York State Education Law. The CSAC specifically reviews current policies and procedures for educating the campus community about: sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking offenses; personal safety and crime prevention; reporting sexual assaults, domestic violence and stalking incidents; assisting victims during investigations; counseling victims; referring complaints to appropriate authorities; and responding to inquiries from concerned persons. The committee reports, in writing, to the College President on its findings and recommendations at least once each academic year. 

CARE Team

(Campus Advocacy, Referral & Education) The CARE Team’s mission is to provide a safe environment for the campus community through collaboration, information collection, risk assessment, and intervention. The CARE Team is a cross-campus team that provides a central place to manage communication regarding concerns for students’ well-being and the safety of the College community, facilitate a timely and appropriate response to these concerns, and provide information to the College community regarding risk issues and resources available.

Weapons Policy

Firearms and dangerous weapons of any type are not permitted on campus, including residence halls. Intentional use, possession, or sale of firearms or other dangerous weapons by anyone is strictly forbidden, and is a violation of state and federal law, as well as, a violation of the Non-Academic Code of Conduct. The College President may authorize in writing the possession of a weapon on campus for special or educational purposes.

notification

Timely Notification & Emergency Response Procedures 

The College’s leadership is trained in assessing emergency situations, responding appropriately to emergencies, and initiating necessary emergency communication in a timely manner with those immediately impacted by the event and the greater campus community. 

Timely Notification 

Emergency Communications

Efficiently and effectively providing information to the campus community about the existence of an emergency, and specific instructions for responding to the particular emergency, is critical to the protection of life. The totality of the means by which the College provides emergency communications to the campus community is referred to as the College’s Mass Notification System. 

Mass Notification System Components

Active Broadcast

The College maintains a public address emergency notification system. The public address system consists of a high-power external speaker array, as well as internal speakers designed to broadcast to all public areas of the main building, athletic facility and childcare center. This system allows emergency personnel to provide specific spoken information to the public areas in and around the building(s) on campus. This system also includes visual alert strobe lights in all public areas of the main building, athletic facility and childcare center.

Passive and Individual Broadcast

The College provides a mobile emergency alert system. This alert system pushes emergency messaging to campus community members via email and cell phone text messaging. All registered students and employees are automatically included in the mobile emergency alert system and all are encouraged to keep the official contact information that they provide to the College updated.

Mass Notification System Testing

The Mass Notification System (MNS) is tested three times a year. Testing of this system may or may not be announced.

Methods of Mass Notification: Timely Warnings and Emergency Alert Notifications

Campus Police are responsible for protecting life and property on campus, and ensuring the health and safety of all campus community members. To achieve this goal, the Director of Campus Police (or designee), along with members of the College Crisis Management Team (comprised of high-ranking College officials), will determine the threat level of an incident and provide the campus community with timely notification regarding any situation on campus, or in the immediate vicinity of the campus, that poses an immediate or ongoing threat to the health and safety of campus community members. Depending on the type, severity, and immediacy of the threat to the campus community, a Timely Warning or Emergency Alert Notification may be issued. 

Timely Warnings

In the event of a situation or crime, either on or off campus, that, in the judgement of the Director of Campus Police (or designee), represents a serious or continuing threat to students and employees, or the greater campus community, a Timely Warning will be issued. When a Timely Warning is issued, it will be sent to the entire campus community. 

Timely Warnings will be sent by Passive and Individual Broadcast as mobile emergency alerts (text and email). Depending on the nature of the crime, notices may also be posted in residence halls and other campus buildings. Timely Warnings will be issued, without delay, as soon as pertinent information is available, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the threat. The amount and type of information contained in the warning will vary depending on the circumstances of the crime.

A Crime Alert will also be posted to the Campus Police website: Crime Alerts/Reports | Tompkins Cortland Community College. The Crime Alert will contain a brief description of the nature of the incident; the date, time and location, as well as precautions that campus community members should take.

Emergency Alert Notifications

In the event that a situation arises on campus, or in the immediate vicinity of campus, that, in the judgement of the Director of Campus Police (or designee), represents a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees, an Emergency Alert Notification will be made. Emergency Alert Notifications will be made using Active Broadcast (public address emergency notification system and visual alert strobe lights). As appropriate, emergency notifications may be targeted at only a segment or segments of the campus community that is at risk. If time and circumstances allow, notification will also be made to campus constituents by Passive and Individual Broadcast as mobile emergency alerts (text and email). 

Emergency Alert Notifications will be made without delay unless making a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency. 

Daily Crime Log 

Campus Police are responsible for creating and maintaining a publically available daily crime log. The purpose of the daily crime log is to record criminal incidents, alleged criminal incidents and instances of fires that are reported to the Campus Police that occur on campus, in or on non-campus buildings or property, or on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, or within the patrol jurisdiction of the Campus Police. All instances of reported crimes and fires must be updated to the Daily Crime Log within two business days of being reported. The Campus Police maintained daily crime log can be accessed at Crime Alerts/Reports | Tompkins Cortland Community College

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Emergency Response Procedures

Tompkins Cortland Community College community members are encouraged to notify the Campus Police of any situation or incident on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation that may involve an immediate or ongoing threat to the health or safety of the campus community. Campus Police has the responsibility of responding to, and summoning the necessary resources, to mitigate, investigate, and document any situation that may cause a significant emergency or dangerous situation. Federal law requires the College to notify the campus community, or portions of the campus community, that may be effected, and to do so in a timely manner. 

The Director of Campus Police (or designee) is responsible for confirming the existence of a significant emergency or dangerous situation, and will, without delay and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of and initiate an emergency alert notification, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise the efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

A confirmed report from another emergency responding agency (such as fire department, ambulance, hazardous materials response team, local law enforcement agency, FBI, County Public Health, etc.) shall also warrant the execution of an emergency alert notification as it pertains to the Tompkins Cortland Community College Campus. 

The emergency alert notification will include information describing the situation and emergency procedures, such as evacuations and shelter in place, to be taken by the campus community. Notifications will be initiated promptly and with a primary focus on the safety of all campus constituents.

Evacuation

One message you may receive by Emergency Alert Notification is to evacuate. To evacuate is to leave an area or building that is, or is about to be, negatively affected and move to a safe area. Evacuation requires all community members to exit a building or area, and in some instances, the campus. One primary factor in determining evacuation (versus sheltering-in-place) is whether evacuation can be facilitated without jeopardizing the life and safety of the evacuees. There may be cases where evacuation is not an option. Rather, circumstances may arise where there is a campus-wide or community-wide disaster of such magnitude that evacuation is rendered unsafe and sheltering-in-place is a better option or even a requirement.

Conditions That May Require Evacuation:

  • Fire
  • Hazardous materials / environmental contaminants
  • Explosion
  • Bomb threat
  • Impending severe weather (e.g., lightning, tornado, high winds)
  • Water supply failure or damage / dangerous condition within a building
  • Air assaults or bombing raids 

Evacuation Guidelines:

  • When a notice to evacuate is received, prepare to evacuate immediately. 
  • Quickly grab important personal items such as cellphones, keys, coat, etc. 
  • Identify possible exit locations. 
  • Close doors behind you. 
  • Walk, do not run. 
  • Evacuation must be quick and orderly. 
  • Do not use elevators. Occupants should exit by way of accessible stairwells.  
  • If safe to do so, assist people with special needs/disabilities. Contact the Campus Police at 607.844.6511, 6511, or 911 for assistance if you encounter any individual who is unable to evacuate for any reason. 
  • Once outside, move to a designated assembly point at least 50-100 feet from the building or an other safe location as conditions dictate. Be sure to allow room for first responder vehicles to access the scene. 
  • Listen for further instructions from first responders, the Mass Notification PA system and/or watch for mobile emergency alerts (text and email). 

If you cannot evacuate, move to the nearest window, signal for help and call Campus Police at 607.844.6511, or 911 as appropriate to the situation. 

Information regarding evacuation guidelines for persons with disabilities can be found at: Emergency Evacuation Procedures for Persons with Disabilities | Tompkins Cortland Community College

Each semester unannounced evacuation drills are conducted in each building on campus. Evacuation drills are conducted three times a year in main campus buildings and four times a year in residential buildings. The purpose of the evacuation drills is to test emergency response and evacuation procedures in each campus facility. By conducting surprise evacuation drills, students and staff are reminded of the locations of emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility. Each semester, the Department of Human Resources emails main building emergency evacuation procedures to all faculty, staff and students. Additionally, evacuation maps are posted in each office suite for employee reference. 

Shelter-in-Place

One message you may receive by Emergency Alert Notification is to shelter-in-place. Sheltering-in-place is used when there isn’t time to evacuate or when certain conditions render it unsafe to do so. Sheltering-in-place means to remain in, or immediately move to the nearest building, and await further instructions. Moreover, certain shelter-in-place emergencies, such as an active threat incident or severe weather, may require you to seek shelter locations within a building that are able to be secured, have no/minimal windows, or are located in an internal space away from exterior walls.

No matter where you are, the basic steps of shelter-in-place will generally remain the same. Should a need ever arise; follow these guidelines, unless instructed otherwise by Campus Police or other first responders. 

Conditions That May Require Sheltering-in-Place:

  • Hazardous materials incident (outdoors)
  • Severe weather (e.g., lightning, tornado, high winds) 
  • Active threat / active shooter situation 
  • Hostage situation 
  • Hostile or violent intruder 
  • Road, traffic, and/or transportation shutdown 
  • Infectious disease outbreak / isolation effort 

Shelter-in-Place Guidelines: 

  • Stop what you are doing immediately. 
  • If safe to do so, collect any emergency shelter-in-place supplies, such as a cellphone, charging cables, water, and medication(s). 
  • If you are outdoors, proceed into the closest and safest building or seek a place of cover. 
  • Take immediate shelter indoors and isolate yourself away from the threat. 
  • Locate an interior room without windows or with the least number of windows. 
  • If there is a large group of people, several rooms may be necessary. 
  • Shut and lock and/or barricade doors. 
  • Turn off lights. 
  • Silence cellphones. 
  • Stay low, away from the door, and out of sight from windows. 
  • Seek shelter under or behind furniture. 
  • Once sheltered-in-place, should a fire alarm sound, do not evacuate unless: 
    • You have first-hand knowledge of a fire in the building. 
    • You have been advised to evacuate by a reliable source, such as first responders, the Mass Notification PA system or emergency mobile alerts (text and email). 
    • You observe an imminent danger in your immediate area. 
  • Await further instructions from first responders, the Mass Notification PA system and/or watch for mobile emergency alerts (text and email). 

Preparing for and responding to emergencies is a campus-wide effort. We encourage each campus community member to be informed and responsible for their own safety. Offices or departments within the College are encouraged to contact the Campus Police Department for questions or concerns related to individualized emergency response planning. All campus community members are encouraged to visit the Campus Police Department at room 118 in the main building or visit the Campus Police website for further information on emergency readiness and response.

Alcohol & Other Drugs

Alcohol & Drug Policy

The College recognizes the dangers posed by the abuse of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs and intends to abide by and strictly enforce all state and federal law governing possession, use, and sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs including, but not limiting to, the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug Free Schools and Community Act of 1989. 

Therefore, the College adopts the following policy:

  • Students and employees are prohibited from possessing or using alcohol or illegal drugs on campus property or during any College activity. An exception to the alcohol possession and use rule may be made by direction of the president (or his/her designee) in specific circumstances and designated campus areas. 
  • The VP of Student Affairs and the Campus Police shall develop appropriate materials to be distributed to all students and employees explaining state and federal laws on the use, possession, and sale of alcohol and illegal drugs on and off campus, at College activities, and prepare educational programs on alcohol or drug abuse. 
  • Students who violate the state or federal law or the College alcohol or drug policy on campus, or at College activities off campus, are subject to prosecution by local, state or federal officials and are subject to discipline under the Student Code of Conduct. Moreover, where appropriate, students will be referred to substance abuse counseling. 
  • Employees who violate state or federal law or the College alcohol and drug policy while on campus, or at College activities off campus, are subject to prosecution by local, state, or federal officials and are subject to discipline under collective bargaining agreements, campus policies, and where appropriate, referred to substance abuse counseling. 
  • All employees directly engaged in performance of work pursuant to the provision federal grant or federal contract in excess of $25,000 and students who are Pell recipients must notify the College with in five days of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring on or off College premises while conducting College business or activities. The College shall, within ten days after receiving such notice, inform the federal agency providing the grant of such conviction within 30 days following the notification of the conviction, appropriate disciplinary action shall be taken against such employees or students. Employees or students may be required at their own expense to participate satisfactorily in a substance abuse assistance or rehabilitation program. 
  • The College Board of Trustees authorizes the administration to develop appropriate procedures and guidelines for the consumption of alcoholic beverages at approved College events. 

View the College’s Annual Notification under the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug Free Schools Act of 1989.

It should be noted that possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages or cannabis by students over the age of twenty-one on residential property is forbidden under the Student Code of Conduct. Students over the age of twenty-one who are found to be in possession of alcoholic beverages or cannabis on residential property will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards for judicial action. 

Student Conduct Sanctions for Alcohol & Drug Violations

Students found responsible for alcohol or drug related offenses will typically be subject to the following sanctions; additional sanctions may also be applied as appropriate. A notice will be sent to parents of all dependent students for drug and alcohol violations and to all students under the age of 21, regardless of dependency status. 

First Offense: At least one semester of conduct probation. First alcohol offense will also be assigned an Options group meeting or individual Options counseling. First drug related offense will be assigned to Options counseling. 

Second Offense: Removal from the residence halls (for students in housing,) deferred suspension from the College, and assignment to the Options program or further drug/alcohol counseling. 

Third Offense: Suspension from the College. Student will be expected to complete appropriate drug or alcohol counseling off campus and will need to have that program follow up with our counseling staff to ensure successful completion of the external program before the student returns to Tompkins Cortland Community College. 

Good Samaritan Policy (GSP)

Abuse of alcohol and other drugs can create life-threatening situations that require an immediate response from emergency services personnel. The GSP is intended to encourage bystanders to call for medical assistance when an individual experiences severe intoxication or a serious injury after consuming alcohol or drugs. People may be reluctant to seek help in such a situation because of potential legal or judicial consequences for themselves or the person in need of assistance. 

Since these emergencies are potentially life threatening, the College seeks to reduce barriers to seeking assistance through the GSP. The GSP represents the College’s commitment to increasing the likelihood that community members will call for medical assistance when faced with an alcohol or drug related emergency. The GSP also promotes education for individuals who receive emergency medical attention related to their own use of alcohol or drugs in order to reduce the likelihood of future occurrences. This protocol is part of the College’s comprehensive approach to reducing the harmful consequences caused by the consumption of alcohol or drugs. 

The following offices have agreed to implement this protocol: Campus Police, Residence Life, Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, Health and Wellness Services, and the VP of Student Affairs. 

Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention Programs

The Options Program: For students who may be concerned about their alcohol or other drug (AOD) use, the Options Program provides assessment, personalized feedback, counseling, and referrals. Options counselors assist students in reducing their risk of experiencing consequences from AOD abuse using research supported best practices of harm reduction including Brief Motivational Interviewing and Alcohol Skills Training. Options counselors also support students who are considering abstaining, or in recovery, from AOD in one-to-one and group settings. Students may be referred to the Program by staff, faculty, relatives, friends, or others. Some students seek education and support in the Options Program on their own. 

Alcohol Awareness Month (AAM): April is National Alcohol Awareness Month, and at Tompkins Cortland Community College, we recognize the risks, and consequences, of alcohol abuse with a number of displays and activities designed to raise awareness about the topic.

Don’t Cancel That Class: The Health Educator and other Student Life and Services staff are available to provide health education programs during cancelled academic classes. All programs are delivered with an engaging, interactive sharing of information and values. Topics include alcohol and drug abuse prevention, violence prevention, stress reduction, flu and disease prevention, exercise prescription, and more. 

Best Life Campaign: A social norms campaign focused on reducing underage drinking and drug use. The campaign addresses alcohol and marijuana use by sharing factual data around student use to address misperceptions. The campaign includes marketing materials as well as in-person interventions to engage students. 

AA / Recovery Meetings: Recovery Meetings are held once a week on campus and are open to all students and staff in recovery. Meetings are facilitated by a student in recovery. 

For more information regarding AOD prevention programming, please contact the Director of Health and Wellness Services, Matt Kiechle, at 607.844.8222, Ext. 4540.

Sexual Assault Prevention & Response (Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence & Stalking Policies)

The College strives to, first and foremost, prevent incidents of sexual assault and dating violence through proactive educational programming. When instances of sexual assault and dating violence do occur, the College is committed to treating the reporting individual with respect, offering reporting and adjudication options, and providing victim support services. 

Prevention Programs & Campaigns

New Student Orientation: Orientation includes a 1-hour session that includes information on affirmative consent, sexual harassment and discrimination policies and procedures, reporting options and resources, and on/off campus victim resources and support services. 

Personal Safety Escorts: Campus Police Officers are available 24/7 to provide personal escorts to any member of the campus community to and from any location on the campus. 

Yards for Yeardley: The College holds this annual event in an effort to raise awareness about domestic violence and teach participants about healthy relationship behaviors and local resources. The entire campus community is encouraged to attend, with participation required for many student groups.

Take Back the Night: The College holds this annual event in an effort to raise awareness about ending sexual, relationship, and domestic violence in all forms. The entire campus community is encouraged to attend, with participation required for many student groups. 

Escalation Workshops: One Love Foundation trained staff are available to provide educational programs during cancelled academic classes. The programming is focused on educating students about health and unhealthy relationship behaviors with the goal of ending relationship and domestic violence abuse. 

Red Flag Campaign: An annual campaign that uses a bystander intervention strategy to address and prevent sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking on college campuses. The campaign encourages friends and other campus community members to say something when they see warning signs (“red flags”) for sexual assault, dating violence, or stalking in a friend’s relationship. 

New Staff Orientations: Each new staff member meets with the Department of Human Resources and receives information related to the College’s policies including Title IX, and sexual harassment and discrimination. 

Online Compliance Training: All College employees are mandated to complete computer-based training modules including Title IX and sexual discrimination and harassment topics.

Email Training Scenarios: Emails to the College community are sent periodically by the Title IX coordinators offering various kinds of sexual discrimination and harassment scenarios and reminding the community of the reporting process when encountering those types of situations. 

Title IX 

All educational institutions in the United States receiving federal funding are required to comply with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which mandates that: “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” 

Tompkins Cortland Community College is committed to maintaining an educational and work environment that is free of any sexual discrimination or harassment and to fostering positive business and personal conduct so that everyone, including students, employees, and visitors, is treated with respect and dignity in a non-discriminatory environment. 

The College has designated four staff/faculty members who are responsible for ensuring Title IX compliance and overseeing investigations related to sexual assault, dating and domestic violence, stalking, and other sex/gender based discrimination complaints. 

Individuals can report to a designated Title IX Coordinator without involving the Campus Police. However, when individuals report to the Campus Police, law enforcement personnel must make notification to the Title IX Coordinators. Likewise, the Title IX Coordinators are responsible for reporting Clery crimes to the Campus Police. 

Title IX contact information:

  • Email: TitleIX@tompkinscortland.edu
  • Darese Doskal, Associate VP of Student Affairs | Main Building, Room 248 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 6591
  • John Geer, Vice President of Human Resources | Main Building, Room 219 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4440
  • Seth Thompson, Interim Vice President of Student Affairs | Main Building, Room 248 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4358
  • Carolyn Boone, Office of Access & Equity Services | Main Building, Room 130 / 607.844.8222, Ext. 4283

Definition of Affirmative Consent

Affirmative consent is a knowing, and voluntary, and mutual decision among all participants to engage in sexual activity. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission regarding willingness to engage in sexual activity. Silence or lack of resistance, in and of itself, does not demonstrate consent. The definition of consent does not vary based upon a participant’s sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. 

  • Consent to any sexual act or prior consensual sexual activity between or with any party does not necessarily constitute consent to any other sexual act. 
  • Consent is required regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. 
  • Consent may be initially given but withdrawn at any time. 
  • Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated, which occurs when an individual lacks the ability to knowingly choose to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitation may be caused by the lack of consciousness or being asleep, being involuntarily restrained, or if an individual otherwise cannot consent. Depending on the degree of intoxication, someone who is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other intoxicants may be incapacitated and therefore unable to consent.
  • Consent cannot be given when it is the result of any coercion, intimidation, force, or threat of harm. 
  • When consent is withdrawn or can no longer be given, sexual activity must stop. 

Application of the Good Samaritan Policy to Sexual Assault and Dating Violence

The College recognizes that students who have been drinking and/or using drugs at the time that sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential legal or student conduct consequences. 

The College strongly encourages students to report incidents of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking to the Campus Police or other Campus Security Authorities. A bystander or reporting individual, acting in good faith, that discloses any incident of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking to the Campus Police or other Campus Security Authorities will not be subject to the College’s code of conduct action for violations of alcohol and/or drug use policies occurring at or near the time of the commission of the sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and/or stalking. 

Student’s Bill of Rights 

When reporting incidents of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking, all students will be provided a written explanation of rights and options. 

All students have the right to:

  • Make a report to local law enforcement and/ or state police;
  • Have disclosures of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault treated seriously; 
  • Make a decision about whether or not to disclose a crime or violation and participate in the judicial or conduct process and /or criminal justice process free from pressure from the institution; 
  • Participate in a process that is fair, impartial, and provides adequate notice and a meaningful opportunity to be heard; 
  • Be treated with dignity and to receive from the institution courteous, fair, and respectful health care and counseling services, where available; 
  • Be free from any suggestion that the reporting individual is at fault when these crimes and violations are committed, or should have acted in a different manner to avoid such crimes or violations; 
  • Describe the incident to as few institutional representatives as practicable and not to be required to unnecessarily repeat a description of the incident; 
  • Be free from retaliation by the institution, the accused and/or the respondent, and/or their friends, family and acquaintances within the jurisdiction of the institution; 
  • Access to at least one level of appeal of a determination; 
  • Be accompanied by an advisor of choice who may assist and advise a reporting individual, accused, or respondent throughout the judicial or conduct process including during all meetings and hearings related to such process; 
  • Exercise civil rights and practice of religion without interference by the investigative, criminal justice, or judicial or conduct process of the College. 

Sexual Assault Procedures & Policies

If you are a victim of a sexual assault at Tompkins Cortland Community College, your first priority should be to get to a place of safety. You should then obtain necessary medical treatment. The Campus Police Department strongly advocates that a victim of sexual assault report the incident in a timely manner. Time is a critical factor for evidence collection and preservation. An assault should be reported directly to the Campus Police at 607.844.6511 or by dialing 911. For those uncomfortable with reporting instances of sexual assault to the Campus Police, reports can also be made to a Title IX Officer, Residence Hall Director or any other Campus Security Authority. 

Filing a police report with the Campus Police Department will not obligate the victim to prosecute, nor will it subject the victim to scrutiny or judgmental opinions from officers. Filing a police report will: 

  • ensure that a victim of sexual assault receives the necessary medical treatment and tests, at no expense to the victim; 
  • provide the opportunity for collection of evidence helpful in prosecution, which cannot be obtained later (ideally a victim of sexual assault should not wash, douche, use the toilet, or change clothing prior to a medical exam); 
  • assure the victim has access to free confidential counseling from counselors specifically trained in the area of sexual assault crisis intervention. 

The victim of a sexual assault may choose for the investigation to be pursued by the Campus Police through the criminal justice system and the College’s Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards, or only the latter. The victim of sexual assault also has the option to pursue the investigation through a local police agency, rather than the Campus Police Department. A Campus Police Officer, Title IX Officer or Residence Hall Director will guide the victim through the available options and support the victim in his or her decision. 

All victims of sexual assault will receive a written copy of Title IX Contacts & Resources which detail contacts and resources for victims of sexual assault nd sexual harassment, including but not limited to: counseling services, health services, victim advocacy, and legal assistance, both within the College and in the local community. 

Confidential Reporting

Confidential Reporting resources are individuals who by law have privileged and confidential status and will not report crimes to law enforcement or college officials without permission from the victim, except for extreme circumstances, such as a health and/or safety emergency. All victims of sexual assault may confidentially disclose an incident to one of the following College offices, who can assist in obtaining services: 

Office of Health and Wellness Services: Main Building, Room 118A, Room 122 607.844.8222, Ext. 4487

Offices that receive confidential reports, may report aggregate crime data to the Campus Police for inclusion in Clery Act disclosures. No personally identifying information about the victim will be made available to the Campus Police or any other College entity.

Requests for Privacy

If a victim discloses an incident to a College employee who is responsible for responding to or reporting sexual violence or sexual harassment, but wishes to maintain confidentiality or does not consent to the institution’s request to initiate an investigation, the reporting employee such as the Campus Police, Title IX or other CSA must weigh the request for confidentiality against an obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all members of the campus community. If it is determined that, for the safety and well-being of the campus, complete confidentiality is not able to be maintained, the College will notify the victim before proceeding. Many factors go into the decision to honor a victim’s request for confidentiality. These factors include, but are not limited to:

  • If the accused has a history of violent behavior or is a repeat offender; 
  • If the incident represents escalation; 
  • If the reported incident involved physical violence, or credible threats of; 
  • If the accused used a weapon; 
  • If the victim/survivor is a minor; 
  • If the campus possesses other means to obtain evidence such as security footage; and 
  • If the report reveals a pattern of perpetration at a given location or by a particular group. 

On-Campus Support Services

Office of Health and Wellness Services: Offers free, confidential counseling services from licensed clinicians, confidential medical counseling, emergency contraception, STD screening and referral to outside providers for all enrolled students. Main Building, Room 118A, Room 122 607.844.8222, Ext. 4487 

Off-Campus Support Services

Counseling and support services outside the College can be obtained through: 

  • Advocacy Center (Ithaca, NY) 24 hour Hotline: 607.277.5000
  • Aid to Victims of Violence (Cortland, NY) 24/7 Hotline: 607.756.6363
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1.800.799.7233
  • National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline: 800.656.4673
  • Cayuga Medical Center, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner, 607.274.4011
  • SUNY SAVR: response.suny.edu

College Disciplinary Procedures

Where there is probable cause to believe the College’s regulations prohibiting sexual assault, domestic partner/dating violence or stalking have been violated, the College will pursue strong disciplinary action through its own channels, whether or not prosecution under New York state criminal statutes is pending. This discipline includes the possibility of suspension or dismissal from the College. 

Conduct Proceedings

Conduct proceedings are governed by the procedures set forth in the Student Rights and Responsibilities section of the Catalog as well as federal and New York State law, including the due process provisions of the United States and New York State Constitutions. 

Throughout conduct proceedings, the accused and the victim will have:

  • The same opportunity to have access to an advisor of their choice. Participation of the advisor in any proceeding is governed by federal law and the Student Code of Conduct; 
  • The right to a prompt response to any complaint and to have their complaint investigated and adjudicated in an impartial and thorough manner by individuals who receive annual training in conducting investigations of sexual violence, the effects of trauma, and other issues related to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking; 
  • The right to an investigation and process conducted in a manner that recognizes the legal and policy requirements of due process and is not conducted by individuals with a conflict of interest; 
  • The right to receive written or electronic notice of any meeting or hearing they are required to or are eligible to attend;
  • The right to have a conduct process run concurrently with a criminal justice investigation and proceeding, except for temporary delays as requested by external municipal entities while law enforcement gathers evidence. Temporary delays should not last more than 10 days except when law enforcement specifically requests and justifies a longer delay; 
  • The right to review available evidence in the case file; 
  • The right to a range of options for providing testimony via alternative arrangements, including telephone/videoconferencing or testifying with a room partition; 
  • The right to exclude prior sexual history or past mental health history from admittance in college disciplinary stage that determines responsibility. Past sexual violence findings may be admissible in the disciplinary stage that determines sanction; 
  • The right to ask questions of the decision maker and via the decision maker indirectly request responses from other parties and any other witnesses present; 
  • The right to make an impact statement during the point of the proceeding where the decision maker is deliberating on appropriate sanctions; 
  • The right to simultaneous (among the parties) written or electronic notification of the outcome of a conduct proceeding, including the sanction(s); 
  • The right to know the sanction(s) that may be imposed on the accused based upon the outcome of the conduct proceeding and the reason for the actual sanction imposed. For students found responsible for sexual assault, the available sanctions are suspension with additional requirements and expulsion/dismissal; 
  • The right to choose whether to disclose or discuss the outcome of a conduct hearing. 
  • Standard of Proof – All student conduct proceedings use the preponderance of evidence except those that fall under the August 14, 2020 Title IX Regulations which use clear and convincing as the standard. 

Sanctions 

When a Conduct Board or Title IX hearing for a sexual misconduct policy violation leads to a finding of responsibility for violating the Non-Academic Code of Conduct, the following guidelines are used in determining sanctions. The purpose of administering sanctions is to hold students accountable for their actions, ensure the safety and well-being of our campus community, and to facilitate learning. Outcomes can vary and are determined on a case by case basis. In addition to the sanctions listed below, educational sanctions, restrictions regarding specific locations/people, removal from housing, etc. may be assigned.

ViolationFirst OffenseSecond Offense

Sex Offense – Rape

Suspension for 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Expulsion

Sex Offense – Statutory Rape

Probation 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Sex Offense – Incest

Probation 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Sex Offense – Forcible Touching

Probation 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Domestic/Dating Violence

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Stalking

Probation for 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Sexual Harassment

Warning;

Probation 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters

Probation 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Deferred Suspension 1, 2, 3, 4 semesters;

Suspension 2, 3, 4 semesters; Expulsion

Right of Appeal

The student in violation (or the reporting individual in a sexual harassment, sexual assault, rape and/or sexual violence case) may appeal the hearing officer’s decision within (10) days of receipt of the findings notification. All appeals should be filed in the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. If the original decision was made by the Director of Student Conduct and Community Standards, the appeal will be heard by the VP of Student Affairs. In all other cases, the appeal will be heard by the Director of Student Conduct and Community Standards. 

All appeals must be filed within ten (10) days of receipt of findings notification. The appeal must be in writing, setting forth the reasons the decision of the hearing officer should not be carried out and specifically setting forth the grounds for such appeal. Requirements for the appeal. The appeal officer shall make a final adjudication and determination in the matter and notify the student of the final decision in writing within two (2) weeks. The appeal officer will determine whether the appeal meets the grounds for an appeal, as well as, whether the decision should be changed. Any sanction imposed by the original hearing officer will be in effect as stated in the sanction letter throughout the period of time that a final appeal is being considered. All appeals of sexual misconduct cases will be heard by a hearing panel and can be requested by the accused student or the reporting student. 

Employee Disciplinary Proceedings

Where there is probable cause to believe the College’s regulations prohibiting sexual assault, domestic partner/dating violence or stalking have been violated by an employee, the College will pursue strong disciplinary action through our campus Discrimination and Harassment process whether or not prosecution under New York State criminal statutes is pending. 

Employee Standard of Proof

In all employee boards, the standard of proof used is clear and convincing. 

Employee Sanction Guidelines

Disciplinary action may include written reprimand, suspension without pay, demotion, discharge, fines or any combination thereof or other such penalties as may be deemed appropriate by the College up to an including termination of employment. 

Protections and Accommodations 

The College will make every effort to be responsive and sensitive to the reporters of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. Protection of the student or employee and prevention of continued trauma is the College’s priority. Assistance for any other personal or academic concerns will be reviewed and options provided. 

When the accuser and the respondent both live in campus housing, an immediate hearing with the Director of Student Conduct and Community Standards will be held to determine the need for modifying the living arrangements. 

When the accused is an employee, a victim/survivor may report the incident to the College Office of Human Resources or may request assistance from any CSA in reporting to Human Resources. Disciplinary proceedings will be conducted in accordance with applicable collective bargaining agreements. When the accused is an employee of an affiliated entity or vendor of the College, College officials will, at the request of the victim/survivor, assist in reporting to the appropriate office of the vendor or affiliated entity and, if the response of the vendor or affiliated entity is not sufficient, assist in obtaining a persona non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and College policy.

The victim has a right to:

  • When the accused is a student, to have the College issue a “Cease and Desist Order,” meaning that continuing to contact the protected individual is a violation of College policy subject to additional conduct charges; if the accused and a protected person observe each other in a public place, it is the responsibility of the accused to leave the area immediately and without directly contacting the protected person; 
  • To have assistance from Campus Police or other College officials in obtaining an Order of Protection or, if outside of New York State, an equivalent protective or restraining order; 
  • To receive a copy of the Order of Protection or equivalent and have an opportunity to meet or speak with a College official who can explain the order and answer questions about it, including information from the Order about the accused’s responsibility to stay away from the protected person(s); that burden does not rest on the protected person(s); 
  • To an explanation of the consequences for violating these orders, including but not limited to arrest, additional conduct charges, and interim suspension;
  • To have assistance from Campus Police in effecting an arrest when an individual violates an Order of Protection or, if outside of New York State, an equivalent protective or restraining order within the jurisdiction of Campus Police or, if outside of the jurisdiction to call on and assist local law enforcement in effecting an arrest for violating such an order; 
  • When the accused is a student and presents a continuing threat to the health and safety of the community, to have the accused subject to interim  suspension pending the outcome of a conduct process; 
  • When the accused is not a member of the College community, to have assistance from Campus Police or Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards in obtaining a persona non grata letter, subject to legal requirements and College policy; 
  • To obtain reasonable and available interim measures and accommodations that effect a change in academic, housing, employment, transportation, or other applicable arrangements in order to ensure safety, prevent retaliation, and avoid an ongoing hostile environment. 

While victims/survivors may request accommodations through any of the offices referenced in this policy, the following office can serve as a point to assist with these measures: Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Main Building, Room 248, 607.844.8222, Ext. 4316

Sex Offender Registry & Related Information

The Sex Offender Registration Act requires the Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) to maintain a Sex Offender Registry. The Registry contains information on sex offenders classified according to their risk of re-offending:

  • Level 1 = low risk
  • Level 2 = moderate risk
  • Level 3 = high risk

The Act also requires DCJS to maintain a subdirectory of Level 3 offenders.

Sex offenders in New York are required to notify the Registry of any institution of higher education at which they are, or expect to be, whether for compensation or not, enrolled, attending or employed and whether such offender resides or expects to reside in a facility operated by the institution. Changes in status at the institution of higher education must also be reported to the Registry no later than 10 days after such change. 

Tompkins Cortland Community College members can find information concerning registered sex offenders at: 

Missing Student Notification Policy & Procedure

If a member of the campus community has reason to believe that a student is missing, they should immediately notify the Campus Police Department at 607.844.6511, or by calling 911. Do not delay reporting if you believe a student is missing. Missing students can also be reported to any Residence Director, and these reports will be immediately forwarded to the Campus Police. 

All residence life students are encouraged to register one or more confidential emergency contacts that would be used by the Campus Police only in the case that the student is reported missing. Students can register this emergency contact by logging into “myTC3” and clicking on the Register Your Missing Person Contact tab. 

On-campus students: Campus Police will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation. Campus Police will notify local police agencies pursuant to stipulations set forth in current Memorandums of Understanding. Campus Police will notify the student’s “Missing Student” emergency contact, and the student’s parents/guardian if the student is under 18 years of age (and not considered emancipated), within 24 hours of the initial Campus Police determination that the student is officially “missing.” This requirement does not preclude implementing these procedures in less than 24 hours if facts and/or circumstances warrant faster implementation. 

Off-campus students: If Campus Police receive a report of a missing student who resides off campus, the investigation will be promptly referred to the proper local law enforcement agency and the Campus Police will assist said agency. 

Pounce

Resources

Campus Resources

  • Campus Police Office: Main Building, Room 118, 607.844.8222, Ext. 6511
  • Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards: Main Building, Room 248 | 607.844.8222, Ext. 4316
  • Title IX Committee (Senior Coordinator): Main Building, Room 248 607.844.8222, Ext. 6591
  • Residence Life Office: 24 Farview Drive, 1st Floor | 607.844.8222, Ext. 6589
  • Office of Health and Wellness Services: Main Building, Room 118A, Room 122 | 607.844.8222, Ext. 4487
  • Office of Student Affairs: Main Building, Room 248 | 607.844.8222, Ext. 4316
  • Office of Diversity Education & Support Services: Main Building, Room 230 | 607.844.8222, Ext. 4358
  • Student Activities Center: Main Building, Student Center | 607.844.8222, Ext. 4442
  • Student Success, Advisement & Transfer Services: Main Building, Room 101 607.844.8222, Ext.4246
  • Athletics Department: Athletic Facility, 2nd Floor | 607.844.8222, Ext. 4492
  • Office of Access & Equity Services: Main Building, Room 130 607.844.8222, Ext. 4283

Local Community Resources

Medical

  • Cortland Regional Medical Center Emergency Room 607.753.3740
  • Cortland County Mental Health Clinic 607.758.6100
  • Cortland Convenient Care | 607.756.7200
  • Cayuga Medical Center Emergency Room (Tompkins) | 607.274.4411
  • Planned Parenthood (Tompkins) 607.273.1513
  • Family Planning of South Central NY (Cortland) | 607.250.9004

Mental Health

  • Tompkins County Mental Health Clinic | 607.274.6200
  • Mental Health Association of Tompkins County | 607.273.9250
  • Crisis Hotline 24/7 (Tompkins) | 607.272.1616 or 1.800.273.8255
  • Crisis Hotline 24/7 (Cortland | 607.756.3771

Domestic Violence / Sexual Assault

  • The Advocacy Center 24 Hour Hotline (Tompkins) 607.277.5000
  • Aid to Victims of Violence 24 Hour Hotline (Cortland) | 607.756.6363 or 1.800.336.9622

Substance Abuse

  • Alcoholics Anonymous (Ithaca) 607.273.1541
  • Alcoholic Anonymous (Cortland) 607.753.1344
  • Alcohol and Drug Council (Tompkins) 607.274.6288

Law Enforcement

  • Tompkins County Sheriff’s Office | 607.272.2444
  • New York State Police
    • Tompkins | 607.347.4440
    • Cortland | 607.756.5604
  • Cortland City Police | 607.756.2811
  • Cortland County Sheriff’s Office | 607.758.5599
  • Dryden Police Department | 607.844.8118
  • Ithaca Police Department | 607.272.9973

Definitions of Clery Crimes & Terms 

The Clery Act requires higher education institutions to disclose reported crimes. A crime is reported when it is brought to the attention of the Campus Police, local police or a campus security authority by a victim, witness, other third party, or even the offender. An institution must disclose reports of crimes that occurred on the campus Clery geography regardless of whether any of the individuals involved in either the crime itself, or in the reporting of the crime, are associated with the institution. The following crime definitions are taken from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook (UCR) as required by Clery Act regulations. 

Criminal Homicide 

(these offenses are separated into two categories):

  • Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. 
  • Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through negligence. 

Sex Offenses

  • Rape: Penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim. 
  • Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or, not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity. 
  • Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  • Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent (17 years of age in New York State). 

Robbery 

The taking or attempting to take anything of value under confrontational circumstances from the control, custody, or care of another person by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear of immediate harm. 

Aggravated Assault

An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. 

Burglary 

The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. 

Motor Vehicle Theft

The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. 

Arson 

Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc. 

Hate Crimes

A hate crime is a criminal offense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender’s bias. For Clery Act purposes, Hate Crimes include all of the above listed crimes and any of the following that are motivated by bias: 

  • Larceny-Theft: The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. are excluded. 
  • Simple Assault: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.
  • Intimidation: To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack. 
  • Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property: To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface, or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it. 

Although there are many possible categories of bias for Hate Crimes, under the Clery Act, only the following eight categories are reported:

  • Race: A preformed negative attitude toward a group of persons who possess common physical characteristics (e.g. color of skin, eyes, and/or hair; facial features, etc.) genetically transmitted by descent and heredity which distinguish them as a distinct division of humankind. 
  • Gender: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons because those persons are male or female. 
  • Gender Identity: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a person or group of persons based on their actual or perceived gender identity, e.g., bias against transgender or gender non-conforming individuals. 
  • Religion: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons who share the same religious beliefs regarding the origin and purpose of the universe and the existence or nonexistence of a supreme being (e.g., Catholics, Jews, Protestants, atheists). 
  • Sexual orientation: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their sexual attraction toward, and responsiveness to, members of their own sex or members of the opposite sex (e.g., gays, lesbians, heterosexuals). 
  • Ethnicity: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of people whose members identify with each other, through a common heritage, often consisting of a common language, common culture (often including a shared religion) and/or ideology that stresses common ancestry. 
  • National origin: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of people based on their actual or perceived country of birth. 
  • Disability: A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their physical or mental impairments/challenges, whether such disability is temporary or permanent, congenital or acquired by heredity, accident, injury, advanced age or illness. 

Domestic Violence (VAWA Definition) 

A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed:

  • By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; or 
  • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; or 
  • By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; or 
  • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or 
  • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred. 

Dating Violence (VAWA Definition)

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purposes of this definition:

  • Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. 
  • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence. 

Stalking

(VAWA definition): Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

  • Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
  • Suffer substantial emotional distress.

For the purpose of this definition:

  • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
  • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. 
  • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. 

Weapon Law Violations 

The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons. 

Drug Abuse Violations

The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. 

Liquor Law Violations

The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness. 

Unfounded Crimes

If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is “unfounded”. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may unfound a crime. 

On-Campus Residential Facility

Any student housing facility that is owned or controlled by the institution, or is located on property that is owned or controlled by the institution, and is within the reasonably contiguous geographic area that makes up the campus is considered an on-campus student housing facility.

Crime Statistics - Tompkins Cortland Community College - 2021-2023

Criminal Offenses

Offense

Year

On Campus Total (including residential housing)

Residential Housing Only

Non-Campus Property

Public Property

Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Negligent Manslaughter

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Rape

2023

2

2

0

0

 

2022

1

1

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Fondling

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

2

2

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Incest

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Robbery

2023

1

1

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Burglary

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

1

1

0

0

 

2021

1

1

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Arson

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

VAWA Offenses

Offense

Year

On Campus Total (including residential housing)

Residential Housing Only

Non-Campus Property

Public Property

Domestic Violence

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

1

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Dating Violence

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

3

2

0

0

 

2021

1

1

0

0

Stalking

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

ARRESTS (Liquor, Drugs & Weapons)

     

Liquor Law Violations

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Drug Law Violations

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Weapons Law Violations

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

0

0

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

DISCIPLINARY REFERRALS   (Liquor, Drugs & Weapons)

     

Liquor Law Violations

2023

31

31

0

0

 

2022

7

7

0

0

 

2021

6

6

0

0

Drug Law Violations

2023

12

11

0

0

 

2022

4

4

0

0

 

2021

19

19

0

0

Weapons Law Violations

2023

0

0

0

0

 

2022

3

3

0

0

 

2021

0

0

0

0

Hate Crimes
YearOffenses

2023

0
20220
20210
Unfounded Crimes
YearOffenses
20230
20221 unfounded Rape in Residential Housing

2021

0

Annual Fire Safety Report

The Higher Education Opportunities Act (HEOA) requires colleges and universities maintaining on-campus housing to compile fire data and issue an annual fire safety report. These reports include statistics on the number of fires, the cause of each fire, the number of injuries and deaths, and the value of property damaged. 

It also includes a description of fire systems, the number of fire drills, evacuation procedures, education and training programs, the institution’s policies (appliances, smoking, open flames, and other potential hazards), and future plans for fire safety improvement. 

In addition, the law requires that institutions must maintain a log of all campus student housing fires, including the nature, date, time, and general location of each fire. This log must be made publicly available and updated within two business days of any reported incident of fire. Tompkins Cortland Community College’s fire safety log.

All instances of fire on campus should be reported immediately to Campus Police by calling 607.844.6511, 6511 from any campus phone, or 911 as appropriate to the circumstances. 

Fire Protection Systems

Tompkins Hall & Cortland Hall

  • Local smoke detectors in each bedroom and apartment common areas 
  • Heat-activated sprinkler system in bedrooms and apartment common areas that will activate general building alarm (audible & strobes) 
  • Building public areas are equipped with heat-activated sprinkler system that activate general building alarm (audible & strobes) 
  • Hallway doors are fire doors that are equipped with magnetic releases upon alarm activation 
  • Building hallways are equipped with manual pull-stations and 3 fire extinguishers 
  • Fire system is continuously monitored and system troubles and alarms are routed to the Campus Police Department for immediate response of appropriate personnel.

Tioughnioga Hall

  • Local smoke detectors (activate entire apartment suite) in each bedroom and apartment common areas 
  • Heat-activated sprinkler system in bedrooms and apartment common areas that will activate general building alarm (audible & strobes) 
  • Building public areas are equipped with smoke detection and heat-activated sprinkler system that both activate general building alarm (audible & strobes) 
  • Hallway doors are fire doors that are equipped with magnetic releases upon alarm activation 
  • Building hallways are equipped with manual pull-stations and 3 fire extinguishers 
  • Fire system is continuously monitored and system troubles and alarms are routed to the Campus Police Department for immediate response of appropriate personnel. 

Tioga Hall, Cayuga Hall, Seneca Hall & Cascadilla Hall

  • Smoke detectors in each bedroom and apartment common areas that will activate general building alarm (audible & strobes) 
  • Heat-activated sprinkler system in bedrooms and apartment common areas that will activate general building alarm (audible & strobes) 
  • Building public areas are equipped with smoke detection and heat-activated sprinkler system that both activate general building alarm (audible & strobes)
  • Hallway doors are fire doors that are equipped with magnetic releases upon alarm activation 
  • Building hallways are equipped with manual pull-stations and 3 fire extinguishers 
  • Fire system is continuously monitored and system troubles and alarms are routed to the Campus Police Department for immediate response of appropriate personnel. 

All residence halls contain 4 handicapped accessible apartments that are equipped with interior strobes, in addition to the above fire protection system elements.

Residential Life Fire Safety Rules & Regulations 

The Residential Life Student Handbook provides policy information on fire safety rules and regulations such as prohibited items and other important information related to residential life and safety. To view the Residential Life Student Handbook, go to: www.tompkinscortland.edu/housing

Prohibited Items

To protect the safety of the campus community and College property, the following items are strictly prohibited:

  • Candles or any open flame devices
  • Incense or potpourri pots
  • Tapestries or other wall coverings, including flags
  • Halogen, torchier lamps & lava lamps
  • Hot plates or portable grills
  • Extension cords
  • Fireworks/pyrotechnics/ammunition
  • Flammable liquids
  • Space heater or air conditioners

Any illegal appliance or items that comes to the attention of any College official will be confiscated and the student will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards for judicial action. 

Smoking Policy

Smoking is prohibited in all College owned or operated buildings. Students smoking indoors will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct & Community Standards for judicial action. 

Smoking includes, but is not limited to, use of cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and personal vaporizers or other devices associated with vaping.

Fire Safety Education

The Campus Police and Residence Life staff provide fire safety training and education throughout the academic year. Fire safety is included in the Campus Police portion of new student orientation, as well as biannual safety and security email reminders. Fire safety information is also included in the Residence Life portion of new student orientation, and the first floor meeting of every year. Resident Assistants (RAs) receive additional fire safety training from our professional staff members and the NYS Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Services. 

In addition to the programs and activities listed above, Campus Police and Residence Life staff typically organize a door-to-door visit each fall with all residence life students to discuss safety issues and College policies, including fire safety topics. 

Fire Evacuation Drills 

As required by the New York State Uniform Fire Code, unannounced fire evacuation drills are conducted twice a semester in residence halls. The first drill will occur within the first ten days after the start of the semester. One drill will be conducted during the hours after sunset or before sunrise and one drill will be held during daylight hours.  Residence Life and Facilities staff conduct the fire drills. 

Fire Evacuation Procedures

Call Campus Police or 911 to report a fire or any other emergency. 

Each building floor is equipped with multiple illuminated exit signs and 3 separate stairwells. Students are encouraged to know the location of all exits and safe assembly areas outside of their respective residence halls. 

In the event of a fire, follow these steps:

  • Pull the nearest manual pull-station (if you cannot reach a pull-station be sure to call 911 while you are exiting the building) 
  • Move quickly to the nearest marked exit stairwell (do not use elevators) 
  • Close doors as you leave 
  • Assist mobility impaired individuals, if needed 
  • If you encounter excessive smoke, stay close to the floor or crawl 
  • Exit the building and proceed to a safe assembly area that is at least 50 feet from the building and out of the way of emergency vehicle traffic 
  • Stay in the assembly area and report any relevant information to Residence Life staff or available first responders (only if safe to do so) 
  • Do not attempt to approach or re-enter the building until cleared to do so by first responders

If you are trapped in a building, call 911 (if possible) to report your exact location. If there is a window available, place an article of clothing, towel, etc. (preferably white), outside the window as a marker for first responders. Stay calm, and stay low to reduce exposure to smoke. Shout at intervals to alert first responders to your location. 

Future Improvements in Fire Safety 

All current fire protection systems meet relevant codes and regulations. The College is committed to voluntarily upgrading the residence hall fire protection systems as funding allows. The College is also committed to a continued emphasis on fire and cooking safety education for residence life students.

2023 Fire Data for Residential Housing

No fires in residential housing

2022 Fire Data for Residential Housing

No fires in residential housing

2021 Fire Data for Residential Housing

DATE

LOCATION

CAUSE

Fire Related Injury

Fire Related Deaths

Property Damage

04/17/2021

Seneca Hall, Apt. 205

Cooking on stovetop

0

0

$7,700

Campus Map

Campus Map

Download Campus Map 

Main Campus and Athletic Buildings Emergency Evacuation Exits

Main Campus Evacuation Points
Athletic Facility Emergency Evacuation Exits

Emergency Evacuation Assembly Points

Evacuation Assembly Points