Chemical Dependency Counseling

Qualified specialists are in demand as we learn more about the frequency and severity of alcoholism and other substance abuse. The Chemical Dependency Counseling degree prepares you as a professional in the addictions field for practice experiences in rehabilitation centers, educational settings, community organizations, inpatient/outpatient programs, residential settings, correctional facilities, hospitals, and related public agencies.

Specialized courses in counseling and prevention are combined with courses in the humanities, social sciences, math, and science. The program also provides required continuing education and clock hours for those already working in the field.

The 350-clock-hour certificate program in Chemical Dependency Counseling is also available at Tompkins Cortland Community College. It is intended for individuals who are, A) seeking a 350-clock-hour certificate to meet New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) credentialing requirements,  B) seeking to enhance their current employment or academic experience with concentrated study in a specialized career field, or C) seeking to complete their certificate program requirements partially or entirely online. Beside the 350 clock hours of education/training, students must also complete one to three years of specific work experience in the chemical dependency field to meet eligibility requirements for the NYS OASAS credentialing examination.

In addition to the degree and certificate, the 250-clock-hour Credentialed Prevention Professional (CPP) and the 120-clock-hour Credentialed Prevention Specialist (CPS) are now also available at TC3. Students interested in prevention credentialing would complete either the chemical dependency degree or certificate program, along with prevention specific coursework. The CPP is intended for individuals with an existing bachelor’s degree who have completed 4,000 hours of relevant paid work experience and have completed the 250-clock-hour program, along with successful completion of the IC&RC exam. The CPS is intended for those who have completed 2,000 hours of paid work experience, have completed the 120-clock-hour program, and have successfully completed the IC&RC exam.

Clock Hours and Continuing Education

The Chemical Dependency Counseling degree and certificate programs provide the 350 clock hours of education and training for credentialed alcoholism and substance counselors (CASAC),  the 250 clock hours of education and training for credentialed prevention professionals (CPP), and the 120 clock hours of education and training for credentialed prevention specialists (CPS)  required by the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, The programs also provide course work for counselors/prevention workers pursuing re-credentialing.

Field Experience

Students will participate in one semester of counseling or prevention related field experience as part of the Chemical Dependency Counseling program. Each four-credit fieldwork course requires 120-150 hours of work experience under the direction of a licensed, certified, or credentialed health care or treatment professional, plus one hour of classroom instruction per week.

Careers on Career Coach

This program provides training for employment in human service and criminal justice agencies as case managers, case workers, social welfare examiners, youth and child care workers, and home visitors. Examples of employers of our graduates include: Cayuga Addiction Recovery Services, Catholic Charities, Seven Valleys Council, Tully Hill CD Treatment Center, Veterans Administration Medical Hospital, the William George Agency, Dick VanDyke ATC, and Willard Drug Treatment Center.

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Explore more career options: A.A.S. | Chemical Dependency Counseling Certificate

Program Chair

Joseph Smith

Joseph L. Smith, Ph.D., LCSW-R, CASAC

Professor, Chemical Dependency Counseling

Dr. Smith is the Program Chair of both the Human Services and Chemical Dependency Counseling Programs at Tompkins Cortland Community College.  He is a NYS Licensed Clinical Social Worker, and a NYS Credentialed Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor.

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Transfer Options

Recent graduates have continued their education in addiction studies, psychology, human services, health education, and social work at:

  • Binghamton University
  • SUNY College at Brockport
  • Cornell University
  • SUNY College at Cortland
  • Empire State College
  • Ithaca College
  • University of Phoenix
  • SUNY College at Plattsburgh
  • Syracuse University

Degree Requirements

A.A.S.
Minimum Credits for Graduation: 62 credits

Fall Term 1

Minimum Total Semester Credits: 15

ENGL100, Academic Writing I, 3 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in ENGL 100. A student exempted from ENGL 100 must substitute a 3-credit Liberal Arts Elective. The course should be selected in consultation with the student's advisor.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
HLTH207, Drug Studies, 3 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in HLTH 207.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
HLTH208, Alcohol and Alcoholism, 3 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in HLTH 208.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
PSYC103, Introduction to Psychology, 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
Select a minimum of 3 credits from the courses listed below:
@
Use Schedule Search for electives

Spring Term 1

Minimum Total Semester Credits: 16

CDSC101, Introduction to Chemical Dependency Counseling, 4 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in CDSC 101.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
ENGL101, Academic Writing II, 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
PSYC209, Abnormal Psychology, 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
SOCI101, Introduction to Sociology, 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
Select a minimum of 3 credits from the courses listed below:
MATH 200 is recommended for students who intend to transfer to a four-year program.
MATH@
Use Schedule Search for electives

Fall Term 2

Minimum Total Semester Credits: 16

CDSC201, Counseling Individuals: Theory & Practice, 3 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in CDSC 201. CDSC 201 is only offered in the Fall semester.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
CDSC232, Chemical Dependency Counseling Field Wk, 4 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in CDSC 232.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
ENGL102, Approaches to Literature, 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
Choose one from the courses listed below:
Minimum credits required: 3
PSYC207, Adolescent Psychology Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
PSYC208, Adult Psychology Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
Choose one from the courses listed below:
Minimum credits required: 3
BIOL100, Human Biology Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
BIOL101, Principles of Biology I Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
BIOL114, Essentials of Nutrition Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi

Spring Term 2

Minimum Total Semester Credits: 15

CDSC210, Group Counseling: Theory & Practice, 3 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in CDSC 210. CDSC 210 is only offered in the Spring semester. ;
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
CDSC225, Counseling Families & Significant Others: Theory & Practice, 3 cr.
A minimum grade of C is required in CDSC 225. CDSC 225 is only offered in the Spring semester.
Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi 
Choose one from the courses listed below:
Minimum credits required: 3
ENGL201, Fundamentals of Speech Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
ENGL204, Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
Use Schedule Search for electives
Select a minimum of 3 credits from the courses listed below:
@
Use Schedule Search for electives


SUNY General Education Courses

Tompkins Cortland Liberal Arts courses

 

 

Note: The @ symbol represents any course number or discipline. For example, BIOL @ means any course with a Biology course prefix. An @ alone means one course in any course discipline with any course number.

Degree Requirements

Certificate: Chemical Dependency Counseling
Minimum Credits for Graduation: 26 credits
CDSC101, Introduction to Chemical Dependency Counseling (C or better), 4 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
CDSC201, Counseling Individuals: Theory & Practice (C or better), 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
CDSC210, Group Counseling: Theory & Practice (C or better), 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
CDSC225, Counseling Families & Significant Others: Theory & Practice (C or better), 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
CDSC232, Chemical Dependency Counseling Field Work (C or better) , 4 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
HLTH207, Drug Studies (C or better) , 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
HLTH208, Alcohol and Alcoholism (C or better) , 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi
PSYC103, Introduction to Psychology, 3 cr. Schedule: Sp, Su, Fa, Wi


SUNY General Education Courses

Tompkins Cortland Liberal Arts courses

 

 

Note: The @ symbol represents any course number or discipline. For example, BIOL @ means any course with a Biology course prefix. An @ alone means one course in any course discipline with any course number.

Degree Requirements

Microcredential: Chemical Dependency Counselor Assistant*
Minimum Credits for Graduation: 16 credits

ENGL 101 Academic Writing II
3 credits
HLTH 207  Drug Studies
3 credits
HLTH 208  Alcohol & Alcoholism
3 credits
PSYC 103  Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
CDSC 101  Introduction to Chemical Dependency Counseling
4 credits

Academic Writing II
This course develops and refines student writing in an academic context. Students engage and respond to challenging texts as they develop critical thinking skills. They learn to support their ideas with credible, authoritative information from academic sources and to recognize audience, purpose, and bias. Special sections may center on a theme. ENGL 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Basic Communication requirement.

Drug Studies
This course deals with current problems, views, and attitudes concerning psychoactive drugs and their usage. Students explore the effects of drugs on human physiology and interpersonal functioning. They are encouraged to consider their own relationship with chemicals and to evaluate information related to specific subject matter.

Alcohol and Alcoholism
This course is a basic study of the drug alcohol and the disease alcoholism. All facets of the subject are discussed, including the sociological, psychological, and physiological. Experts who represent various areas, such as the medical profession, the law, rehabilitation, counseling, and psychiatry are called upon to share their knowledge and expertise with the class. An honest and practical look is taken at a drug affecting most of us in some way.

Introduction to Psychology
This course provides students with a basic understanding of the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. Prevalent psychological theories and research will be introduced. Topics may include: psychological research, biology and behavior, sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, development, emotion, motivation, personality, mental disorders, therapy and social psychology.

Introduction to Chemical Dependency Counseling
This course is designed to provide an introduction to clinical interviewing and substance abuse counseling. Students explore and practice basic and essential dimensions of interviewing techniques, methodology, and applications. Students gain insight into theoretical, practical, and ethical issues associated with chemical dependency counseling. Guidelines associated with core skills of the helping relationship and confidentiality are explored.

* Please contact admissions. Financial aid restrictions apply. Student must complete 50% of microcredential coursework at Tompkins Cortland to earn credential.

Degree Requirements

Microcredential: Residential Aide*
Minimum Credits for Graduation: 15 credits

ENGL 101    Academic Writing II    
3 Credits
HLTH 207 or HLTH208  Drug Studies or Alcohol & Alcoholism
3 Credits
PSYC 103     Introduction to Psychology 
3 Credits
CDSC 101 or HUMS 105 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Counseling or Introduction to Human Services     
3 Credits
CDSC 210 or HUMS 114 Group Counseling: Theory & Practice or The Process of Group Communication
3 Credits

Academic Writing II
This course develops and refines student writing in an academic context. Students engage and respond to challenging texts as they develop critical thinking skills. They learn to support their ideas with credible, authoritative information from academic sources and to recognize audience, purpose, and bias. Special sections may center on a theme. ENGL 101 fulfills the SUNY General Education Basic Communication requirement.

Drug Studies
This course deals with current problems, views, and attitudes concerning psychoactive drugs and their usage. Students explore the effects of drugs on human physiology and interpersonal functioning. They are encouraged to consider their own relationship with chemicals and to evaluate information related to specific subject matter.

Alcohol and Alcoholism
This course is a basic study of the drug alcohol and the disease alcoholism. All facets of the subject are discussed, including the sociological, psychological, and physiological. Experts who represent various areas, such as the medical profession, the law, rehabilitation, counseling, and psychiatry are called upon to share their knowledge and expertise with the class. An honest and practical look is taken at a drug affecting most of us in some way.

Introduction to Psychology
This course provides students with a basic understanding of the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. Prevalent psychological theories and research will be introduced. Topics may include: psychological research, biology and behavior, sensation, perception, learning, memory, cognition, development, emotion, motivation, personality, mental disorders, therapy and social psychology.

Introduction to Chemical Dependency Counseling
This course is designed to provide an introduction to clinical interviewing and substance abuse counseling. Students explore and practice basic and essential dimensions of interviewing techniques, methodology, and applications. Students gain insight into theoretical, practical, and ethical issues associated with chemical dependency counseling. Guidelines associated with core skills of the helping relationship and confidentiality are explored.

Introduction to Human Services
The purpose of this course is to identify agencies in the community that provide human services. Emphasis is placed on examination of the particular mission, objectives, organization, staffing patterns, and funding of such agencies. The interaction of various roles of the human service network is also examined. The course is intended for human service students, as well as for interested community members. The instructional modes include lecture, seminar, agency visits and presentations.

Group Counseling: Theory & Practice  
This course is devoted to group theory and interventions with chemically dependent individuals. A variety of theoretical perspectives and empirically supported approaches are reviewed. Techniques for assessment, treatment, and care coordination are discussed. This course includes material on special populations, best practices, and relapse issues.

The Process of Group Communication
This course examines group process and its relationship to service organizations. Students study norms, roles, group rules, power, and leadership of small groups. Students experience and evaluate new techniques and methods of working with small groups in a human service setting.

* Please contact admissions. Financial aid restrictions apply. Student must complete 50% of microcredential coursework at Tompkins Cortland to earn credential.

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